Democrats Might Be Unable To Capitalize On Disgust For Republicans Due To Growing Disgust For Democrats Too

We very likely will see a wave election in 2018 which gives the Democrats the opportunity to pick up seats in protest against Donald Trump and the Republican Party. The Democrats have achieved victories this week in New Hampshire and Florida. However, there are also signs of danger for the Democrats, including lack of support among millennial voters and strong interest in a third party among all voters.

An NBC News/GenForward poll shows that Democrats cannot take millennials for granted:

Millennials overwhelmingly disapprove of the way President Donald Trump is handling his job and they don’t have a favorable view of the Republican Party. But Democrats shouldn’t celebrate just yet, according to results from the first NBC News/GenForward Survey.

A majority of millennials, 64 percent, disapprove of Trump’s job performance, while 58 percent said they have an unfavorable view of the Republican Party…

Millennials are a critical group for Democrats, and although they feel warmer toward the party than they do the GOP, they don’t feel overwhelmingly positive about either party.

Similarly, millennials were more likely to say the Democratic Party cares about people like them than the Republican Party does. Only three in 10 millennials said the Republican Party cares about people like them. Still, nearly half (46 percent) of millennials said they don’t think the Democratic Party cares about them.

In other words, millennials aren’t fully convinced that either party best represents their interests…

A majority of white millennials hold unfavorable views of both the Democratic Party (54 percent) and the Republican Party (53 percent).

Similarly, neither party has convinced a majority of white millennials that their policies are sufficiently concerned with people like them — 60 percent of white millennials said the GOP doesn’t care about people like them, and 55 percent said the Democratic Party doesn’t care about people like them.

Overall, a third of millennials (33 percent) said that neither party cares about people like them — a significant portion of young adults when considering the growth of the millennial electorate.

Antipathy towards both parties was also seen in a Gallup poll which shows that about sixty percent of Americans see a need for a third party:

Nearly twice as many Americans today think a third major party is needed in the U.S. as say the existing parties do an adequate job of representing the American people. The 61% who contend that a third party is needed is technically the highest Gallup has recorded, although similar to the 57% to 60% holding this view since 2013. Barely a third, 34%, think the Republican and Democratic parties suffice.

While more than three-quarters of political independents would prefer to have a third major-party player in the U.S. political system, Republicans and Democrats are closely split between favoring that and saying the current two-party system is adequate.

More specifically, 49% of Republicans think a third major party is needed, while 46% say the Republican and Democratic parties are adequate. The split is similar among Democrats: 52% would prefer having a third major party, while 45% prefer the existing two-party structure. Meanwhile, 77% of independents favor having a third major party, while just 17% think the Democratic and Republican parties are adequate.

Neither poll does a good job of looking at the reasons for dissatisfaction with both parties. I would attribute this to the Republican Party going batshit crazy, and the Democratic Party responding by trying to be just slightly less batshit crazy, while refusing to  stand up for liberal principles.

The Democrats had the opportunity to lock up much of the millennial vote in 2016 by nominating Bernie Sanders. Instead they used party rules in place since McGovern’s loss, along with further intervention in the process, to hand Hillary Clinton the nomination in a manner which was no different from choosing a candidate in the proverbial smoke filled rooms. This gave us a general election in which neither major party had an acceptable candidate, demonstrating the need for a third party. Unfortunately most of those who express the need for a third party did not actually vote for one.

This all leaves the question open as to whether Democrats will be able to take advantage of opposition to the Republicans, especially if they repeat the mistake they have made in recent elections and run as a Republican-lite party.

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4 Comments

  1. 1
    Robert Doyle says:

    I voted for a third party, I have been an always will be and unenrolled, independent, as Maine calls us. I cast my Ballot  for Bernard Sanders, and wrote him in on election day. The money, of the Corporate whores is what has lost our government to us. They drive up deficit and debt, taking all they want. N ever seeing it is the people , working , living , hoping here that matter. Endless war, Corporate theft, Tax cuts for those that already have to much, And no plan for our future will will our end. The Traders are already surrendering our land, water, woods, and countrymen to The Banksters and Brothelites of this world.

  2. 2
    Robert L Bell says:

    Ho, hum, one note symphony toots on.

    But this line really takes the cake – "The Democrats had the opportunity to lock up much of the millennial vote in 2016 by nominating Bernie Sanders."

    You keep telling yourself that, but there is a reason that Bernie got his butt kicked in the primary (( despite Candidate Clinton and the DNC having made the deliberate decision not to lay a glove on him )).  That reason is, obviously, that he is simply not popular except among a limited crowd that worships the ground upon which he walks.

    But all this is good news for Leftists.  The more you and your gang annoy the real people, the more folks will tune you out and  the better chance Leftist Ideals have to succeed in the political and social arenas.

     

  3. 3
    Ron Chusid says:

    Bernie hardly got h is but kicked in. He did far better than anyone would have predicted, despite the degree to which the system was rigged against him.

    His popularity was hardly among a limited crowd. Bernie brought in not only independent voters, but a significant number of Republican voters, as was clearly shown in the polls.

    The refusal of people like you to acknowledge the facts contributed to the nomination of Clinton and therefore the election of Donald Trump.

  4. 4
    SocraticGadfly says:

    Don't blame me. I've voted Green every presidential election this century.

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