Desperate Conservatives Calling Bernie Sanders A Nazi

Bernie Sanders National Socialism

Bernie Sanders must be scaring the right wing as calling Sanders a socialist isn’t enough for them. An article from National Review practically calls him a Nazi, along with including some references to Stalin. The article outright claims he is a national socialist, which is just a more polite way to say Nazi:

In the Bernieverse, there’s a whole lot of nationalism mixed up in the socialism. He is, in fact, leading a national-socialist movement, which is a queasy and uncomfortable thing to write about a man who is the son of Jewish immigrants from Poland and whose family was murdered in the Holocaust. But there is no other way to characterize his views and his politics.

The rest of the article isn’t any better. The article accuses Sanders of xenophobia, based upon twisting his views on the adverse effects of  outsourcing jobs overseas, which is especially absurd coming from a conservative movement which thrives on racism and xenophobia.

Later in the article are twisted claims that, “criminalizing things is very much on Bernie’s agenda, beginning with the criminalization of political dissent” and that he would get rid of the First Amendment. This is hardly consistent with Sanders’ actual record on civil liberties. It was also Bernie Sanders who was calling for the repeal of laws by which the government infringes upon the private lives of individuals, going back to his campaign for governor of Vermont in the 1970’s:

Bernie Sanders Letter

In this letter, Sanders complained about the erosion of freedoms under Richard Nixon and wrote: “…there are entirely too many laws which regulate human behavior. Let us oppose all laws which attempt to impose a particular brand of morality or ‘right’ on people. Let’s abolish all laws dealing with abortion, drugs, sexual behavior (adultrey, homosexuality, etc.).”

We know where the right wing stands on such issues. They are truly the ones who not only compromise First Amendment rights, but support “criminalizing things” which vary from their brand of morality.

I would think that just being a self-described democratic socialist would be enough to satisfy the paranoia of the right wing. Maybe they realize that once voters take a close look at Sanders’ economic policies, many Americans would be quite pleased. While the top one percent might object to losing the special favors from government which help them accumulate their wealth, the rest of the country would come out ahead, including those in the private sector. Creating a stronger middle class would be good for capitalism, and Sanders has made it clear he has no objection to the private sector. As I pointed out in May, there was no Red Dawn in Vermont when Sanders became mayor of Burlington. As Politco noted:

In 1988, toward the end of Sanders’ four-term tenure — long after a local Democratic leader predicted the movement that swept Sanders into office would be gone in a decade — the U.S. Conference of Mayors named Burlington the most livable city in the country with a population of under 100,000 (in a tie). Then Sanders’ director of community and economic development succeeded him in the mayor’s office and Inc. Magazine named Burlington the best city in the Northeast for a growing business.

Steve Benen also pointed out this bizarre criticism of Sanders from the right:

Sanders and his supporters will very likely find this criticism infuriating, and with good reason. But what’s striking to me is the fact that the criticism exists at all.
It wasn’t long ago that the Republican establishment and conservative media were content to ignore Sanders and his ideas. If his name came up at all, it was used as a punch-line – Sanders was a liberal caricature, not to be taken seriously.
That’s obviously changed. As Sanders’ crowds grow and his poll standing improves, the Vermonter has positioned himself as worthy of National Review condemnation. To be sure, it’s unpersuasive, needlessly provocative condemnation, but it’s also evidence of a prominent national figure whom the right is no longer inclined to discount as irrelevant.
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3 Comments

  1. 1
    David Duff says:

    Would this be the same:

    "Bernie Sanders, who marched for civil rights in the 1960s. He was just the man to paper over the cracks. Or so it seemed to liberals who hadn’t read his Wikipedia entry, which records that as a congressman he ‘voted for a National Rifle Association (NRA)-supported bill to restrict lawsuits against gun manufacturers’. [My emphasis]

    Maybe that’s because, although born in New York, he lives in the hunting grounds of Vermont. More significantly, he’s passionately opposed to open-door immigration.

    That’s because he’s a socialist, a concept that Whole Foods customers don’t understand: they just think it means a quaint old liberal with really radical opinions.

    Now, it’s true that Sanders is liberal on social issues: he’s pro-abortion, pro-gay marriage and very green. (His brother Larry, who lives in England, was Green Party candidate for Oxford West and Abingdon in the 2015 general election.)

    But his liberalism is an aspect of his socialism, not the other way around. He sees inequality in America as structural and economic: poor black and white people are victims of the same fundamental injustice."

    http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/coffeehouse/2015/07/tragedy-on-the-american-left-as-liberals-discover-that-bernie-sanders-isnt-awesome/

  2. 2
    Ron Chusid says:

    You keep forgetting, conservative sites regularly distort the facts. That is their purpose–distort the facts to promote their agenda. A description of him from a conservative site will most likely distort his views and record. For example, he has received rankings of D- and F from the NRA. He also has a libertarian streak and has not voted for 100% of all restrictions on guns.

    This problem isn’t limited to conservative sites. Not surprisingly, Clintonistas have also been distorting his record on guns. It hasn’t seemed to have dampened enthusiasm for him on the left.

  3. 3
    Kevin Duncil says:

    This is coming directly out of the Karl Rove handbook. You can go back to the campaign that he ran for Bush, for the governors mansion in Texas, and again when he ran for president, both times, and the tactics are still the same.

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