Cynthia Nixon Protesting Stupak Amendment

While everyone has been concentrating on the positive and negative aspects of the Senate health care bill, the big problem with the House bill has almost been forgotten. Cynthia Nixon has been speaking out against the Stupak amendment:

It’s been a little more than a week since Cynthia Nixon flew back from filming “Sex and the City 2” in Morocco, and she’s already diving headfirst into the debate surrounding abortion and health care reform.

Nixon, a longtime abortion rights activist, says she can’t keep quiet about the recent health care bill amendments that would limit insurance coverage for abortions.

“It’s a very basic female right that we need to protect,” Nixon said. “What’s so frightening about this Stupak ban is that he’s found a backdoor way to basically not cover abortion for the vast majority of American women.”

The Stupak-Pitts amendment, written by Democratic Rep. Bart Stupak of Michigan and Republican Rep. Joseph R. Pitts of Pennsylvania, is a point of contention in the House health care bill. The amendment would limit funds in the health care bill, preventing subsidies from directly paying for abortions and also from paying for any insurance plan that covers abortions.

The prohibition excludes cases of rape, incest or when the mother’s life is in danger.

CNN interviewed Nixon about her protests of the Stupak amendment:

CNN: You’ve been very outspoken in the past few years about LGBT issues and rights, but not as much about reproductive health. When did you start becoming vocal about being pro-choice?

Cynthia Nixon: I’ve been involved since I was 15, so we’re talking almost 30 years now.

My mother had an illegal abortion pre-1973, and it’s something that I would never want to face or want my daughter to be facing or any of her friends. Abortion is a right I feel must not go away, and I feel like people aren’t mobilizing so much because it’s so complicated and it’s difficult to understand.

CNN: But some say that all the Stupak-Pitt amendment does is essentially hold up the current law that restricts federal funding from providing abortions.

Nixon: That’s patently false. The new people coming in would be people making less than $88,000 a year in a family of four and would be getting their insurance in the form of tax credit. That credit is coming through the federal government.

[For] the majority of women who have health insurance now, abortion is covered as a complete given. Once these new people come in, we’re looking at adding 36 million people to these tax credits, and they will not have abortion offered as an option on their health insurance. That’s a really large chunk of people, but the thing is also how it will affect the marketplace. …

They’re saying you could buy [a rider] additionally, but for how much? It’s going to be exorbitantly expensive, and it’s not a thing people are going to do.

By the very nature of abortion, nobody intends to have one. Nobody intends to get pregnant by mistake, nobody intends to be raped, nobody intends to be [a victim of incest], and no one intends, in the course of a wanted pregnancy, to have a catastrophic event that requires an abortion.

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    Leslie Parsley says:

    “By the very nature of abortion, nobody intends to have one. Nobody intends to get pregnant by mistake, nobody intends to be raped, nobody intends to be [a victim of incest], and no one intends, in the course of a wanted pregnancy, to have a catastrophic event that requires an abortion.”

    I wish that could be a slogan. So poignant. I don’t think most anti-abortionists think of any of this. Maybe four people could line up with signs, each one beginning with “nobody.”

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