Obama To Cash In On Superdelegate Bank

There’s been talk that Obama has a “delegate bank” ready to release this week to put him over the top. Matthew Yglesias has made the point that if he had such a bank it would be better to have them commit before tomorrow’s primaries. He argues that, “on a symbolic plane it seems to me that you want to clinch things with an election result rather than an endorsement announcement.”

I suspect that Obama would have had these superdelegates go public if he was able to. Bill Richardson has tried to push them to commit before the final primaries. I fear this is yet another example of Richardson having the right idea  but lacking the  political skills to properly express it.

Most likely “delegate bank” was the wrong analogy because, while there most likely are many superdelegates who are on the verge of endorsing him, Obama cannot pull them out at will as easily as taking money out of a bank. Many have their own reasons for delaying the public announcement of their support for Obama. Some might think it is better to have the voters have their say before weighing in. Others would prefer not to openly go up against the Clintons until they can cover their actions by arguing that Obama’s nomination was inevitable.

One group does appear to be waiting to announce but will be doing so soon according to CNN:

Most of the seventeen Democratic senators who have remained uncommitted throughout the primaries will endorse Barack Obama for president this week, CNN has learned.

Sources familiar with discussions between Obama supporters and these senators tell CNN’s Gloria Borger that the senators will wait until after the South Dakota and Montana primaries to announce their support for Obama.

Two sources familiar with the sessions said the endorsements will come sometime later this week.

Obama supporters have been “pressing” for these superdelegates to endorse earlier in the week, but according to one source, “the senators don’t want to pound Hillary Clinton, and there is a sense she should be given a grace period.”

Most likely these superdelegates, along with delegates won this week and other superdelegates who are likely to endorse Obama, will be enough to put Obama over the top. Whether or not Clinton wants to acknowledge it, the nomination race ends this week.

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5 Comments

  1. 1
    Politivine.com says:

    I really hope that he can end it tomorrow night. With a strong showing of superdelegates over the next 24-36 hours, he can end it tomorrow night.

    I find it odd that Clinton will be giving her speech tomorrow night from NY. That is a sign that tomorrow night could in fact be a concession speech.

  2. 2
    Ron Chusid says:

    It might not be a concession speech. It might just mean that Clinton is an elitist who would rather spend the night in New York than in South Dakota or Montana 🙂

  3. 3
    Politivine.com says:

    You may have a point Ron!
    As I was just watching MSNBC, her campaign surrogates are STILL on cable news saying that she is still in the race and they are making their case to the superdelegates. These people just do not learn do they?
     
     

  4. 4
    Ron Chusid says:

    That’s no surprise.

    Just wait until there’s snow on the ground and they are still arguing that the nomination battle is not over yet.

  5. 5
    LooseKannon says:

    Following the South Dakota and Montana primaries, and regardless of their outcomes, the superdelegates are going to come out en masse for Barack Obama. So much so that it will become clear that even if Hillary were to press her Michigan/Florida delegate case at the convention and garner all the delegates from those races that she’d like to, she still wouldn’t be able to wrest the nomination from Obama.
    As the party elders haven’t been able to convince her that her premature coronation of 18 months ago has been withdrawn due to popular demand, they will convince the far more public spirited supers that the time has come to make the nominee clear, so that the national campaign can begin without further delay.

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