A Victory for Science in the War on Science

Here’s a story from a earlier in the month which I missed, but picked up thanks to Mike the Mad Biologist. The Washington Post reported that the inspectors general at two agencies are looking into the Bush administration’s suppression of science:

Inspectors general at two agencies have begun an investigation into whether the Bush administration has suppressed government scientists’ research on global warming, officials at NASA and the Commerce Department confirmed yesterday.

Prompted by a request this fall by 14 Democratic senators, the IGs are examining whether political appointees have prevented climate researchers at NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from conveying their findings to the public.

The issue of global warming has emerged as one of the most contentious scientific debates within the administration. In the past year, several federal climate scientists, including James Hansen, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, have accused the administration of muzzling them, a charge the White House has denied.

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), a member of the Environment and Public Works Committee and author of the Sept. 29 letter to the two inspectors general, said yesterday in an interview that he was pleased about the investigation. “It’s extremely important, because the evidence is so obvious that they’ve tried to block the presentation of information on this in an unbiased fashion,” Lautenberg said.

With Congress now under Democratic control I hope to see even more action to end the Republican war on science.

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4 Comments

  1. 1
    kj says:

    Slowly, reason returns. I hope.

  2. 2
    janet says:

    Our household is happy. Hubby and his scientist colleagues across the country now have hope again that grants will be funded. It is depressing and scary how cutting edge research that benefits all of us and our children and grand children has been stifled the last 6 years. Who knows what we have lost? These men and women of science have been feeling like they have been pedaling a bike uphill through thick mud.

  3. 3
    kj says:

    janet,

    We are hopeful here as well. Hub flew out today to meet with colleagues to plan grants and will turn around once he gets home for another round of talks. He’s happier than I’ve seen him in months, even though our financial situation is still precarious. …pedaling a bike uphill through thick mud is exactly correct. It’s been a long, dark night for science. I don’t know what we’ve lost… a lot. How many students went through crucial years in school these past six years? How many went through university? How many opted out of careers in research? Arg.

  4. 4
    kj says:

    HOPE HOPE HOPE.
    Yeah for science. It’s been brought back from the brink. 🙂

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